Assistive listening technology on campus

Assistive listening technology support deaf and hard of hearing staff and students to hear more clearly by reducing background noise. These devices can transmit sound via magnetic field, infrared light, radio waves, or Bluetooth to receivers like personal hearing aids or “looped” headphones.

The majority of Central Teaching Spaces are fitted with infrared transmitters (IR) and some spaces on campus have induction loop systems installed. Information about equipment installed within rooms on campus is available on the Timetabling System and room booking website, where you can view details about room accessibility (including types of hard of hearing system) via the Room Information web page during the room booking process.

Students, staff and visitors are welcome to contact the Facilities Directorate helpdesk for further information or enquiries about assistive listening devices available on campus. Phone 0113 343 5555 or email eshelp@leeds.ac.uk.

This Powerpoint document provides information about using the audio-visual equipment system in the University Council Chamber in the Ziff Building, including details about the hard of hearing system on page 16.

Infrared transmitters (IR)

Symbol for Infrared transmitters (IR)

Rooms equipped with Infrared transmitters (IR) will be marked with this symbol (or similar).

Rooms equipped with Infrared transmitters (IR) will be marked with this symbol (or similar).

To make arrangements to collect an IR receiver please contact the facilities directorate helpdesk phone 0113 343 5555 or email eshelp@leeds.ac.uk.

 

 

 

Induction loop systems

Symbol for Hearing Loop

Rooms with an induction loop system installed will be marked with this symbol (or similar).

Rooms with an induction loop system installed will be marked with this symbol (or similar).

The induction loop system works with hearing aids. The hearing loop provides a magnetic, wireless signal that is picked up by the hearing aid when it is set to the ‘T’ (Telecoil) setting.

The hearing loop consists of a microphone to pick up the spoken word; an amplifier which processes the signal which is then sent through the loop cable, a wire placed around the perimeter of the meeting room acts as an antenna that radiates the magnetic signal to the hearing aid.